Tag Archives: One Ring

One is all & all is one … in Quenya

One is all all is one in Quenya

NEW quote translated into Quenya!

Izumi Curtis @ Fullmetal Alchemist

(Requested by Eloise Roseraie and answered in 77 hours with HUGE Tengwar (perfect for a tattoo) through Tattoo Q101)

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War is what it will be!

It’s gone! It’s done!

With those words of relief, Frodo conclude the task that was appointed to him. We also conclude our top 10 LotR Board Games right now, with the #1 board game of all time! All other games you can see here: #10#9#8 #7#6#5#4,  #3 & #2, but no place for 2nd places, right here right now, we got GOLD we got:

#1

War of the Ring (Second Edition)

(2012)

pic1215633

As its predecessor…

In War of the Ring, one player takes control of the Free Peoples (FP), the other player controls Shadow Armies (SA).

Initially, the Free People Nations are reluctant to take arms against Sauron, so they must be attacked by Sauron or persuaded by Gandalf or other Companions, before they start to fight properly: this is represented by the Political Track, which shows if a Nation is ready to fight in the War of the Ring or not.

The game can be won by a military victory, if Sauron conquers a certain number of Free People cities and strongholds or vice versa. But the true hope of the Free Peoples lies with the quest of the Ringbearer: while the armies clash across Middle Earth, the Fellowship of the Ring is trying to get secretly to Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring. Sauron is not aware of the real intention of his enemies but is looking across Middle Earth for the precious Ring, so that the Fellowship is going to face numerous dangers, represented by the rules of The Hunt for the Ring. But the Companions can spur the Free Peoples to the fight against Sauron, so the Free People player must balance the need to protect the Ringbearer from harm, against the attempt to raise a proper defense against the armies of the Shadow, so that they do not overrun Middle Earth before the Ringbearer completes his quest.

Each game turn revolves around the roll of Action Dice: each die corresponds to an action that a player can do during a turn. Depending on the face rolled on each die, different actions are possible (moving armies, characters, recruiting troops, advancing a Political Track).

Action dice can also be used to draw or play Event Cards. Event Cards are played to represent specific events from the story (or events which could possibly have happened) which cannot be portrayed through normal game-play. Each Event Card can also create an unexpected turn in the game, allowing special actions or altering the course of a battle.

This one is surely the ultimate experience one might expect when playing a game about Lord of the Rings. As I recently watched a Dice Tower Top 10 list (by the way wherein this kind of post was inspired) Sam Healey said: “War of the Ring IS The Lord of the Rings” in board game format.

I hope you enjoyed Quenya101 top 10 LotR board game and perhaps it’ll serve you like a guide for the next time you wanna acquire some tabletop fun!

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War is what it is!

And here’s is the Silver Medal of our Top 10 LotR Board Games. You can check other games elected at #10#9#8 #7#6#5#4 & #3. The game below has already been reviewed here, and it’s no big surprise is #2 in the list. (Why not the #1? You’ll see…)

#2

War of the Ring

(2004)

pic725882

 

In War of the Ring, one player takes control of the Free Peoples (FP), the other player controls Shadow Armies (SA).

Initially, the Free People Nations are reluctant to take arms against Sauron, so they must be attacked by Sauron or persuaded by Gandalf or other Companions, before they start to fight properly: this is represented by the Political Track, which shows if a Nation is ready to fight in the War of the Ring or not.

The game can be won by a military victory, if Sauron conquers a certain number of Free People cities and strongholds or vice-versa. But the true hope of the Free Peoples lies with the quest of the Ringbearer: while the armies clash across Middle Earth, the Fellowship of the Ring is trying to get secretly to Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring. Sauron is not aware of the real intention of his enemies but is looking across Middle Earth for the precious Ring, so that the Fellowship is going to face numerous dangers, represented by the rules of The Hunt for the Ring. But the Companions can spur the Free Peoples to the fight against Sauron, so the Free People player must balance the need to protect the Ringbearer from harm, against the attempt to raise a proper defense against the armies of the Shadow, so that they do not overrun Middle Earth before the Ringbearer completes his quest.

Each game turn revolves around the roll of Action Dice: each die corresponds to an action that a player can do during a turn. Depending on the face rolled on each die, different actions are possible (moving armies, characters, recruiting troops, advancing a Political Track).

Action dice can also be used to draw or play Event Cards. Event Cards are played to represent specific events from the story (or events that could possibly have happened) that cannot be portrayed through normal gameplay. Each Event Card can also create an unexpected turn in the game, allowing special actions or altering the course of a battle.

This is certainly the apple of my eye. A lovely long board game not designed for faint hearts. If you got a free day (and I really mean a whole day), grab your sit and a friend and play this little fellow! You’ll relive all the experiences you read and watched. You’ll be in Middle-Earth!

To be continued…

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A quest in our Middle-Earth

Top 10 LotR board games continues taking up from the previous parts (#10#9#8 #7#6 & #5) and now we got a very juicy game in our 4th place. It’s “symbolically” a bronze medal (you’ll understand that later when our top 10 is finished). And the game is:

#4

Middle-Earth Quest

(2009)

pic717059

 

Middle-earth Quest takes place approximately ten years after Bilbo Baggins leaves the Shire, and several years before Frodo leaves Bag End on his journey leading to the destruction of the One Ring. Thus, Middle Earth Quest will take place in a time of growing darkness. Players will take control of characters such as a Gondorian Captain, a Rider from the Westfold, or numerous other character types. Not only will characters be able to experience new adventure in Middle Earth, but we will carefully seek to tie in the experience with the massive amounts of lore and story that takes place around the edges of the central THE LORD OF THE RINGS storyline.

Middle-earth Quest is a game of adventure and conflict set in the time leading up to the creation of the Fellowship. One player will adopt the mantle of Sauron and do his best to spread his evil influence across the lands. Up to three players become heroes and will do their best to foil Sauron’s foul plots, and rally the peoples of Middle-earth to their side.

This is absolutely a must-have if you enjoy long and deep board games. It’s a pretty large one (and as the legend goes “the larger the board game, the deeper and cooler it is”). I saw just once people playing it, never had to chance to sit down and battle for any quest in Middle-Earth, but in the future I’m gonna surely buy this big one!

To be continued…

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Share the burden of the Ring

Time to continue with our Top 10 Lord of the Rings Board Game! We have already had #8, #9 & #10 previously. If you love board games like I do, this is the top 10 to follow. Here we go with…:

#7

Lord of the Rings

(2000)

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Lord of the Rings is a co-operative game where the object is to destroy the Ring while surviving the corrupting influence of Sauron. Each player plays one of the Hobbits in the fellowship, each of which has a unique power. The game is played on a number of boards: the Master board indicates both the physical progress of the fellowship across Middle Earth and the corrupting influence of Sauron on the hobbits, and a number of scenario boards which detail the events and adventures of particular locations. Progression across the boards is determined by playing cards (many of which represent the characters and items of Middle Earth), and the effects of corruption are represented by a special die. The game is lost if the ring-bearer is overcome by Sauron, or won if the ring is destroyed by throwing it into the volcanic fires of Mount Doom.

Lord of the Rings – Limited Edition

A special edition limited to 500 copies in the English language and 250 in German published by Sophisticated Games and Kosmos in November 2001. The Limited Edition has a silver 22 carat gold plated ring, pewter Hobbit playing pieces, and a signed and numbered John Howe print. Box signed by Reiner Knizia.

Well, frankly, this is not my kind of game, I don’t know…maybe I’m wrong and I’d love it when I play it with the right group of people. If you research it a bit, there’s tons of people playing it everywhere and they really seem to have a good time with it! Lord of the Rings seems to deserve the spot #7 in our Top 10.

to be continued…

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Tolkien dies!

You are not reading something on the internet because it was not invented yet.

Today is 09/03/73. You wake up, take a good look in the mirror and start wondering how this Monday is gonna be like. There’s no time to waste as you gotta rush to the work. You take a quick breakfast and start driving as soon as possible. At the office, you go to your desk and BOOOOM, it’s there! That piece of paper that mocks you, that challenges you to believe it, yeah that short story on that piece of paper says:

DailyCollegian_4Sep73_obit

“Oh no!” you think! That cannot be! How could you live without the precious stories that were meant to come from the Professor? You were waiting anxiously for the continuing of The Lord of the Rings, speculated by some and awaited by all. This cannot be happening! What about the grammar book you coveted so much which would take a deep insight in the languages of Tolkien, something you wanted, something you needed, something you wished so much….but….then, everything is gone. It’s dead. You are defeated by reality. She is bitter, she doesn’t care for you. She bites and she took her toll today. Your day gets even worse when you realize for sure THIS IS HAPPENING when you read the Professor’s Obituary:

 

J. R. R. Tolkien Dead at 81; Wrote ‘The Lord of the Rings’

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

LONDON, Sept. 2-J. R. R. Tolkien, linguist, scholar and author of “The Lord of the Rings,” died today in Bournemouth. He was 81 years old. Three sons and a daughter survive.

Creator of a World

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien cast a spell over tens of thousands of Americans in the nineteen-sixties with his 500,000-word trilogy, “The Lord of the Rings,” in essence a fantasy of the war between ultimate good and ultimate evil.

Creating the complex but consistent world of Middle Earth, complete with elaborate maps, Tolkien peopled it with hobbits, elves, dwarves, men, wizards and Ents, and Orcs (goblins) and other servants of the Dark Lord, Sauron. In particular, he described the adventures of one hobbit, Frodo son of Drogo, who became the Ring Bearer and the key figure in the destruction of the Dark Tower. As Gandalf, the wizard, remarked, there was more to him than met they eye.

The story can be read on many levels. But the author, a scholar and linguist, for 39 years a teacher, denied emphatically that it was an allegory. The Ring, discovered by Frodo’s uncle, Bilbo Baggins, in an earlier book, “The Hobbit,” has the power to make its wearer invisible, but it is infinitely evil.

Tolkien admirers compared him favorably with Milton, Spenser and Tolstoy. His English publisher, Sir Stanley Unwin, speculated that “The Lord of the Rings” would be more likely to live beyond his and his son’s time than any other work he had printed.

‘Escapist Literature’

But detractors, among them the critic Edmund Wilson, put down “The Lord of the Rings,” Tolkien’s most famous and most serious fantasy, as a “children’s book which has somehow gotten out of hand.” A London Observer critic condemned it in 1961 as “sheer escapist literature… dull, ill-written and whimsical” and expressed the wish that Tolkien’s work would soon pass into “merciful oblivion.”

It did anything but. It was just four years later, printed in paperback in this country by Ballantine and Ace Books, that a quarter of a million copies of the trilogy were sold in 10 months. In the late sixties all over America fan clubs sprouted, such as the Tolkien Society of America, and members of the cult-many of them students-decorated their walls with the maps of Middle Earth. The trilogy was also published in hard cover by Houghton Mifflin and was a Book-of-the-Month Club Selection.

The creator of this monumental, controversial work (or sub-creator as he preferred to call writers of fantasy) was an authority on Anglo-Saxon, Middle English and Chaucer. He was a gentle, blue-eyed, donnish-appearing man who favored tweeds, smoked a pipe and liked to take walks and ride an old bicycle (though he converted to a stylish car with the success of his books).

From 1925 to 1959 he was a professor at Oxford, ultimately Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and a fellow of Merton College. He was somewhat bemused by the acclaim his extracurricular fantasy received-at the endless interpretations that variously called it a great Christian allegory, the last literary masterpiece of the Middle Ages and a philological game.

Tolkien maintained, however, that it wasn’t intended as an allegory. “I don’t like allegories. I never liked Hans Christian Andersen because I knew he was always getting at me,” he said.

The trilogy was written, he recalled, to illustrate a 1938 lecture of his at the University of Glasgow on fairy stories. He admitted that fairy stories were something of an escape, but didn’t see why there should not be an escape from the world of factories, machine-guns and bombs.

It was joy, he said, that was the mark of the true fairy story: “…However wild its events, however fantastic or terrible the adventures, it can give to child or man that hears it, when the ‘turn’ comes, a catch of the breath, a beat and lifting of the heart, near to (or indeed accompanied by) tears, as keen as that given by any form of literary art, and having a peculiar quality.”

His own fantasy, it was said, had begun when he was correcting examination papers one day and happened to scratch at the top of one of the dullest “in a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” Then hobbits began to take shape.

They were, he decided, “little people, smaller than the bearded dwarves. Hobbits have no beards. There is little or no magic about them, except the ordinary everyday sort which helps them to disappear quietly and quickly when large stupid folk like you and me come blundering along, making a noise like elephants which they can hear a mile off. They are inclined to be fat in the stomach; they dress in bright colors (chiefly green and yellow); wear no shoes, because their feet grow natural leathery soles and thick warm brown hair like the stuff on their heads (which is curly); have long clever brown fingers, good-natured faces and laugh deep fruity laughs (especially after dinner which they have twice a day when they can get it).”

Discovering England

He settled these protected innocents in a land called Shire, patterned after the English countryside he had discovered as a child of 4 arriving from his birthplace in South Africa, and he sent some of them off on perilous adventures. Most of them, however, he conceived as friendly and industrious but slightly dull, which occasioned his scribble on that fortuitous exam paper.

“If you really want to know what Middle-earth is based on, it’s my wonder and delight in the earth as it is, particularly the natural earth,” Tolkien once said. His trilogy was filled with his knowledge of botany and geology.

The author was born in Blomfontein on Jan. 3, 1892, a son of Arthur Reuel Tolkien, a bank manager, and Mabel Suffield Tolkien, who had served as a missionary in Zanzibar. Both parents had come from Birmingham, and when the boy’s father died, his mother took him and his brother home to the English Midlands.

England seemed to him “a Christmas tree” after the barrenness of Africa, where he had been stung by a tarantula and bitten by a snake, where he was “kidnapped” temporarily by a black servant who wanted to show him off to his kraal. It was good, after that, to be in a comfortable place where people lived “tucked away from all the centers of disturbance.”

At the same time, he once noted in an essay on fairy stories, “I desired dragons with a profound desire. Of course, I in my timid body did not wish them to be in the neighborhood, intruding into my relatively safe world…”

His mother was his first teacher, and his love of philology, as well as his longing for adventure, was attributed to her influence. But in 1904 she died.

The Tolkiens were converts to Catholicism, and he and his brother became the wards of a priest in Birmingham. (Some critics maintained that the bleakness of industrial Birmingham was the inspiration for his trilogy’s evil land of the Enemy, Mordor.)

Served in World War I

Young Tolkien attended the King Edward’s Grammar School and went on to Exeter College, Oxford, on scholarship. He received his B.A. in 1915. But World War I had begun, and, at 23, he began service in the Lancashire Fusiliers. A year later he married Miss Edith Bratt.

The war was said by his friends to have profoundly affected him. The writer C. S. Lewis insisted that it was reflected in some of the more sinister aspects of his writing and in his heroes’ joy in comradeship. Tolkien’s regiment suffered heavy casualties and when the war ended, only one of his close friends was still alive.

Invalided out of the Fusiliers, Tolkien decided in the hospital that the study of language was to be his metier. He returned to Oxford to receive his M.A. in 1919, and to work as an assistant on the Oxford Dictionary. Two years later he began his teaching career at the University of Leeds.

Within four years, he was a professor, and had also published a “Middle English Vocabulary” and an edition (with E. V. Gordon) of “Sir Gawayne and the Green Knight.” He received a call to Oxford, where his lectures on philology soon gave him an extraordinary reputation.

His students remember him as taking endless pains to interest them. One recalled that there was something of the hobbit about him. He walked, she said, “as if on furry feet,” and had an appealing jollity.

Meanwhile, once he had scratched that word “hobbit” on the examination paper, his curiosity about hobbits was piqued, and the book of that name-the precursor of the more serious “The Lord of the Rings”-began to grow.

It was nurtured by weekly meetings with his friends and colleagues, including the philosopher and novelist C. S. Lewis and his brother, W. H. Lewis, and the mystical novelist Charles Williams. The Inklings, as they called themselves, gathered at Magdalen College or a pub to drink beer and share one another’s manuscripts.

C. S. Lewis thought well enough of “The Hobbit,” which Tolkien began to write in 1937 (and told to his children), to suggest that he submit it for publication to George Allen and Unwin, Ltd. It was accepted, and the American edition won a Herald Tribune prize as best children’s book.

The author always insisted, however, that neither “The Hobbit” nor “The Lord of the Rings” was intended for children.

“It’s not even very good for children,” he said of “The Hobbit,” which he illustrated himself. “I wrote some of it in a style for children, but that’s what they loathe. If I hadn’t done that, though, people would have thought I was loony.”

“If you’re a youngish man,” he told a London reporter, “and you don’t want to be made fun of, you say you’re writing for children.”

“The Lord of the Rings,” he admitted, began as an exercise in “linguistic esthetics” as well as an illustration of his theory on fairy tales. Then the story itself captured him.

Took 14 Years to Write

In 1954 “The Fellowship of the Ring,” the first volume of the trilogy, appeared. “The Two Towers” and “The Return of the King” were the second and third parts. The work, which has a 104-page appendix and took 14 years to write, is filled with verbal jokes, strange alphabets, names from the Norse, Anglo-Saxon and Welsh. For its story, it calls, among others, on the legend of “The Ring of the Nibelung” and the early Scandinavian classic, the “Elder Edda.”

Meanwhile, Tolkien was also busy with scholarly writings, which included “Chaucer As a Philologist,” “Beowulf, the Monster and the Critics” and “The Ancrene Wisse,” a guide for the medieval anchoresses.

After retirement, he lived on in the Oxford suburb of Headington, “working like hell,” he said, goaded to resume his writing on a myth of the Creation and Fall called “The Silmarillion,” which he had begun even before his trilogy. As he said in an interview a few years ago, “A pen is to me as a beak is to a hen.”

And this was the end of your day. But not only that. Your dreams ended today. They are buried deep underground while a hole remains in your heart. Tolkien’s gone! It all started with a hole in the ground where lived a hobbit and it all ended this Monday morning when you came to office and you read the news.

The end.

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Can you face the RISK in LotR?

Resuming our Top 10 LotR board games, now we have….

#9

Risk: The Lord of the Rings Trilogy Edition

(2003)

Risk

A new version of Risk, with the following differences:

The map is of Middle Earth, and the tokens represent armies of that fictional world.

You play either good or evil.

Leaders, missions and sites of power have been added.

The One Ring acts as a timing mechanism, when it leaves the board, the game ends.

  • Gameboard
  • 4 Complete armies in different colors:

– 40 Elven Archers/Orcs
– 12 Riders of Rohan/Dark Riders
– 6 Eagles/Cave Trolls
– 2 shields per color

  • 42 Territory Cards (9 Good, 9 Evil, 24 Neutral)
  • 2 Wild Cards
  • 40 Adventure Cards
  • The One Ring
  • 3 Red Dice
  • 2 Black Dice

And in this expanded Trilogy Edition, there’s also:

  • The detailed gameboard reflects a complete map of Middle-Earth including the Gondor, Mordor, and Haradwaith territories.
  • Includes materials from the entire Lord of the Rings film trilogy.
  • Additional Territory cards.
  • Additional Battalions.
  • Additional Adventure Cards.
  • Alternate ways to play including special rules for alliance team play.

If you’re a wargames fan like I am, this one should bring some hours of fun to your table. After all, it’s RISK we’re talking about! Risk+LotR! It couldn’t get better!

to be continued…

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War Of The Ring Board Game

Are you a fan of Lord of the Rings? Are you a fan of board games? If both answers are yes, then War Of The Ring was made for you! I bought my copy of the first edition in 2006 and had had excellent long matches with my nephew. Oh, I remember too well. Great games they were. But I have a word of caution for you. If you don’t like long games, you won’t enjoy this one! You need to be prepared if you wanna embark in such gaming experience and adventure. Below a summary about how the game works, if it’s good for you and some photos to help you decide if you wanna give it a shot.

pic725882

In War of the Ring, one player takes control of the Free Peoples (FP), the other player controls Shadow Armies (SA).

Initially, the Free People Nations are reluctant to take arms against Sauron, so they must be attacked by Sauron or persuaded by Gandalf or other Companions, before they start to fight properly: this is represented by the Political Track, which shows if a Nation is ready to fight in the War of the Ring or not.

OldBoard

The game can be won by a military victory, if Sauron conquers a certain number of Free People cities and strongholds or vice-versa. But the true hope of the Free Peoples lies with the quest of the Ringbearer: while the armies clash across Middle Earth, the Fellowship of the Ring is trying to get secretly to Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring. Sauron is not aware of the real intention of his enemies but is looking across Middle Earth for the precious Ring, so that the Fellowship is going to face numerous dangers, represented by the rules of The Hunt for the Ring. But the Companions can spur the Free Peoples to the fight against Sauron, so the Free People player must balance the need to protect the Ringbearer from harm, against the attempt to raise a proper defense against the armies of the Shadow, so that they do not overrun Middle Earth before the Ringbearer completes his quest.

eye

Each game turn revolves around the roll of Action Dice: each die corresponds to an action that a player can do during a turn. Depending on the face rolled on each die, different actions are possible (moving armies, characters, recruiting troops, advancing a Political Track).

pic1423300_md

Action dice can also be used to draw or play Event Cards. Event Cards are played to represent specific events from the story (or events that could possibly have happened) that cannot be portrayed through normal gameplay. Each Event Card can also create an unexpected turn in the game, allowing special actions or altering the course of a battle.”

The game is well structure and it respects a lot the theme. Basically, if you’re the Shadow Armies, you’ll use your full force to hammer all Free cities, conquer them as fast as you can. Hunting for the Ring is definitely something you should do too. The Nazgûl are awesome with the ability to fly, pretty useful. If you’re the Free Peoples…run! Run, Forrest, Run! You gotta be quick and cautious with the Fellowship. It’s hard to balance that but there’s where the golden ticket lies. Frodo must be protected at all costs and meanwhile, you gotta resist as best as you can all the attacks from the armies of Sauron.

Well, if you have already played this game, you know what I mean and all the electricity that flows within the game. I’m a lover of board games! I’m really into them when I’m playing and I don’t care if one match’s gonna take 30 minutes or 8 hours! I go for it!

War of the Ring is THE ultimate experience if you wanna relive all the action of Lord of the Rings, but not only that….you can interfere, you’re the one who’s changing the fate of Middle-Earth depending on our strategies and actions. Cool game, awesome fun! DO TRY IT!

This article was created thanks to boardgamegeek.com

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Dear Diary…today I gave gifts to all Middle-Earth, RINGS!

sauron_gorthaur__mairon__annatar__by_civilwar_loki-d5wi1wb

Date: II 2204
My mood is: Crafty

Annatar, Lord of Gifts, is back in business, and business is good. I have distributed all 16 of my Rings of Power, and now I’m just waiting for the payoff.

The Dwarves were the easiest to trick — no surprise there, anything created by Aulë is going to be dumb as a post, just like its creator. All I had to do was hint to my Dwarven contacts that some magic rings were available, and the poor stupid bastards came to me.

First I got a delegation from Khazad-dûm, demanding magic rings from me — their king, Durin the Umpteenth, claimed that the rings were made with Moria-gold, and so were rightfully his. So I pretended for a while I didn’t want to give up any rings, and then “caved” to the pressure. The Khazad-dûm Dwarves got three rings, and then I gave another two to the Dwarves of Belegost and another two to Nogrod. Anyway, as long as these stumpy morons take care of their rings (and don’t let them get eaten by dragons), I will soon rule the Dwarven race!

Men have been more difficult to ensnare, as any King of Men with the power and intelligence to be worth ensaring tends to have friends amongst the accursed Elves and their Númenórean allies. But I have managed to find nine who will make useful servants — three of them are Númenórean Sea-Kings, so-called “Black Númenóreans,” whose fear of death led them to accept my rings; and one was even a woman. The first to accept a ring, El-Murazor, is now over 500 years old, and just beginning to feel “thin” and “stretched.” He can’t see it, but he’s beginning to get permanently transparent — within 50 years he’ll be a full-blown wraith. Then he’s all mine.

And when I have total control over nine Kings of Men and seven Kings of the Dwarves, the Elves will have lost all their allies in Middle-Earth. Then all I have to worry about is the damned Númenóreans, and I have a few ideas on that front. Yes, I do.

Bwa ha ha. BWA HA HA. BWA HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!

Well, dinner is ready, gotta go. Later tonight I’m gonna spend a few hours polishing  my Ring — it’s precious to me, and I like to spend time with it. No, that’s not weird. It’s mine, my own… my precious.

___________________

Mordor Financial Controller comments: “Did you get receipts for those rings? We can write them off as marketing expense.”

Ghost of one of your orcs says: “Well, things finally seem sorted out. I mean, what are the chances that a dragon could get into a dwarven city? I mean, a giant flying lizard going underground? Those rings are safe.”

Ashi points out: “Gift-giving is good Karma, I see this paying off in the end.”

Taken from the excellent spirited Sauron’s Blog! Creative derivative stuff with a pinch of humor and it adds flavor for those who enjoy the bad guys too! Check:  http://www.sauronsblog.com/

sauron-hula-hoop

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Middle-Earth, prostate & other jokes…

This is a Tumblr funny images which I felt like collecting here at one place. You know…to share with you all. Some may be fresh jokes to you… or not (it depends on how many accounts you got on Facebook, Tumblr and so on) Most of them I reblogged and some of them I created myself (like the highlighted image below).

Enjoy!

White Tree Award

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Special Poem & Prose Edition II

Here’s the 2nd Special Edition of Poem & Prose! This time the poem analyzed (one again by Ondo Carniliono) is the most famous of all!! Check it below…you’ll know what I mean!

Original version

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

Wondrous effects by Ondo Carniliono!

Quenya version

Cormar neldë i Quendi-aranin nu i vilya,
Cormar otso i Naucor-heruvin hrótassë,
Cormar nertë i Firyarin umbarina qualmen,
Er corma i Morna Herun morna mahalmassë
Mordoressë tanomë i Lumbulë caita.
Er corma turien te ilyë, er corma hirien te,
Er corma hostien te ilyë ar avalerien te i morniessë
Mordoressë tanomë i Lumbulë caita.

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